Marshmallows have been on my “to make” list for years now, ever since a woman at our elementary school made them for our family dance, and they were fantastic. I still haven’t gotten around to make them, but I will. Instead, I was inspired by another idea to make homemade marshmallow fluff because, yum.. right? Except I try not to eat too many things that have as many ingredients as marshmallow fluff does. The fact that it can sit on my shelf for months after being opened and still be considered edible sort of grosses me out. So of course I made my own.

Super easy marshmallow fluff recipe that doesn't use corn syrup

I’m regretting it just a little bit.  That’s not to say that my experiment wasn’t tasty. Quite the opposite, and that’s the problem. I made homemade marshmallow fluff and now all I want to do it eat it. I don’t care if it’s licking off the beater (done), licking out the bowl (done), or oh, I don’t know, just eating it with a spoon. Then there’s my bright idea of making the best s’mores in the world using the marshmallow fluff, graham crackers, and Nutella. Save me.

Best s'mores ever with homemade marshmallow fluff and nutella

I’m already planning to pawn off some of it on my son’s teacher who I know appreciates good food. Forget the fact that he’s on a diet (and doing well). This is one of those things you make an exception for. And he’s got kids, so they can enjoy it, too. The rest of it will have to be hidden in the back of my refrigerator in the hopes that I forget that I made it. Not likely. This recipe made about 5 cups or so of marshmallow fluff, which would be perfect to use as filling for a cake or even frosting for cupcakes. You could cut down the recipe, but it’s so easy to make and uses so few ingredients, that I’m ok with making a little more and sharing my bounty. If I did this with only one egg, I don’t feel like I’d get it whipped up as well, and the quality would suffer.

For this recipe, I didn’t want to use corn syrup, which is part of what many recipes call for to create a smooth, glossy finish. We don’t tend to eat corn syrup here in general. I thought about making it without any similar product – and I may yet play with that idea – but I hit upon the idea of using agave nectar, since it was sitting in my pantry staring me in the face. I also rejected the idea I’ve seen in some places of cooking the egg and sugar together in a double boiler to avoid scrambling the eggs, but to keep the sugar texture from getting grainy over time, it really needs to get to the soft ball stage, and eggs can’t be cooked that high. So much for my idea of saving a bowl. (Apologies in advance to my husband for the sink of dishes he has today – it’s worth it, I promise!)

This is a great marshmallow fluff recipe, and it tastes great on its own. I used vanilla bean paste as the only flavoring, aside from salt. I could see this being made with cinnamon, cocoa, or even java extract to give it some great fun flavor and make it even more unique. This just might be what I bring to the next Chicago Food Swap. It’s that good.

Homemade marshmallow fluff in a jar for storage

Homemade Marshmallow Fluff

The homemade marshmallow fluff may sound a little scary, but I promise it comes together quickly. Invest in a candy thermometer (they’re cheap and that’s an affiliate link, meaning if you buy it I earn a few pennies) that ensures you know when to stop cooking the sugar, and have a little patience for this to whip together, and you’ll love what you end up with.

To start, separate your eggs, and place the whites into a clean bowl. Save the yolks for another recipe. My recommndation? Either pineapple curd or lemon curd. Use them a a dip for fruit or filling for cake or – gasp – mix them with your homemade marshmallow fluff, and you’ll truly be in heaven!

Back to the homemade marshmallow fluff. In a saucepan larger than you think you will need – this expands as it boils up – add the sugar, agave nectar or honey, and water. You can use corn syrup, but I like it best with honey or agave. Turn the heat to medium and gently swirl the pan every 30 seconds or so to mix the ingredients together. Use a pastry brush to wash the sides with water to ensure no sugar crystals are adhering to the side of your pan. Those will cause your marshmallow fluff to be grainy later.

While your sugar is cooking, beat your egg whites to a soft peak, no more. This will take just a couple minutes, so watch them. Once they’re done, they can rest for the few minutes the sugar mixture will take to finish.

Egg whites beaten to soft peaks

Bring the sugar mixture to a boil, and add your candy thermometer. Because you are using agave nectar or honey, you need to watch the temperature, as the change in color won’t signify here. Cook to 240 degrees.

Cook sugar mixture to 240 degrees by your candy thermometer

Once the sugar mixture is at 240 degrees, remove it immediately from the heat. Turn your mixer on low and add just a dribble of the sugar mixture to your eggs to temper them. You want to heat them slowly so that they incorporate the mixture without scrambling. Do this two to three times, then pour all the sugar mixture in slowly while beating.

Add sugar mixture to egg whites

Once the sugar syrup is all added, turn your mixter to medium. Add the salt and vanilla bean paste, and turn the mixer to high. Beat for 5 or so minutes, until the fluff has gotten thick and glossy. It will start out steaming with you thinking you made a mistake, but you’ll quickly see that it incorporates perfectly and beats to a beautiful consistency.

Store in a sealed container in your fridge (hello, eggs) for up to a week, if it lasts that long.

Homemade Marshmallow Fluff Recipe

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Yield: 5 cups

Homemade Marshmallow Fluff Recipe

Ingredients

  • 3 egg whites
  • 3/4 c sugar
  • 1/2 c agave nectar
  • 1/4 c water
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 1 t vanilla bean paste

Instructions

  1. Separate your eggs, and place the whites into a clean bowl. Save the yolks for another recipe.
  2. In a saucepan larger than you think you will need - this expands as it boils up - add the sugar, agave nectar, and water. Turn the heat to medium and gently swirl the pan every 30 seconds or so to mix the ingredients together. Use a pastry brush to wash the sides with water to ensure no sugar crystals are adhering to the side of your pan. Those will cause your marshmallow fluff to be grainy later.
  3. While your sugar is cooking, beat your egg whites to a soft peak, no more. This will take just a couple minutes, so watch them. Once they're done, they can rest for the few minutes the sugar mixture will take to finish.
  4. Bring the sugar mixture to a boil, and add your candy thermometer. Because you are using agave nectar, you need to watch the temperature, as the change in color won't signify here. Cook to 240 degrees.
  5. Once the sugar mixture is at 240 degrees, remove it immediately from the heat. Turn your mixer on low and add just a dribble of the sugar mixture to your eggs to temper them. You want to heat them slowly so that they incorporate the mixture without scrambling. Do this two to three times, then pour all the sugar mixture in slowly while beating.
  6. Once the sugar syrup is all added, turn your mixter to medium. Add the salt and vanilla bean paste, and turn the mixer to high. Beat for 5 or so minutes, until the fluff has gotten thick and glossy. It will start out steaming with you thinking you made a mistake, but you'll quickly see that it incorporates perfectly and beats to a beautiful consistency.

Notes

Store in a sealed container in your fridge (hello, eggs) for up to a week, if it lasts that long.

http://www.honestandtruly.com/homemade-marshmallow-fluff-recipe/

    Comments

  • Sarah


    Cannot wait to try this recipe! Since we have food allergies, including one to corn, this is perfect. Thank you!

    • Michelle


      I think you might like it… It’s possible that I gave some to our mutual friend whose children now like me more than their own mom 😉 Totally get it, as I was trying to avoid many of those allergens myself. Good luck – and check out the strawberry idea, too!

      • Sarah


        🙂

  • Jenn


    Yum, yum and yum.
    I don’t know whether to love or hate you for the taste you offered today, because me and anything having to do with a candy thermometer…disaster.
    Maybe because I am so easily distracted….

    I will have to try this, just because no corn syrup.
    Looks like I have to add vanilla bean paste and agave nectar to my pantry….

  • Michelle


    Wow, can’t wait to try to make this yummy stuff! 🙂 Michelle

  • Swisspea


    Wow! Thank you SO much for this! I live abroad and a cupcake filling recipe called for marshmallow fluff. Although I’ve had success in the past, I couldn’t find it ANYWHERE. I’ve always had failures when making meringues, so I thought marshmallow fluff wouldn’t work for me either. Well, I was wrong. This recipe was SO much easier than I anticipated. I didn’t have agave, so I used a mixture of honey and maple syrup.

  • Chi Tco


    Just want to point out a few things. First, your recipe has two MORE ingredients than Marshmallow Fluff, which only has four (corn syrup, sugar, dried egg white, and vanillin).

    Also, all of the ingredients in Marshmallow Fluff, including the corn syrup, are non-GMO (the reason why it can be sold in Germany, which has very strict regulations against GMOs). And agave nectar is no better than regular old corn syrup — and may be worse. Agave is 90% fructose, which gives it a low glycemic index but can cause considerable metabolic problems.

    Your marshmallow creme looks delicious, though!

    • Michelle


      I don’t disagree on the count of the ingredients. That said, vanillin is an ingredient I do my best to avoid as it’s a petroleum by-product. Also, I have several friends with a corn allergy, which renders corn syrup something they can’t eat – and alllllll the items with corn syrup something they can never enjoy. When I make this, it’s something my generally very restricted friends can enjoy, and you should see their 9 and 12 year old faces! I’m also fascinated that this is all non-GMO, as I’ve never seen it advertised or noted anywhere that the ingredients are non-GMO, but I’d love to learn more, as that’s something else I do my best to avoid!

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